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Animal Services - Pet Evaluation Matrix
Animal Services Unit
 
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Supervisor
Donald L. Rose

Phone
(804) 748-1683

Email - for general information only 


Hours
Monday - Friday
10:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Saturday 
10:30 a.m. - 4 p.m.

Street Address
Chesterfield County Animal Services Office
9300 Public Works Road
Chesterfield, Va 23832
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Mailing address
P.O. Box 148
Chesterfield, VA 23832

 

Animal Services Unit
Animal Services - Pet Evaluation Matrix

The Pet Evaluation Matrix is used to help shelter staff identify healthy and behaviorally adoptable dogs and cats.

Healthy

Definition: The term “healthy” means and includes all dogs and cats eight weeks of age or older that, at or subsequent to the time the animal is taken into possession, have manifested no sign of a behavioral or temperamental characteristic that could pose a health or safety risk or otherwise make the animal unsuitable for placement as a pet, and have manifested no sign of disease, injury or congenital or hereditary condition that adversely affects the health of the animal or that is likely to adversely affect the animal’s health in the future.  


Treatable Rehabilitatable

Definition: The term “rehabilitatable” means and includes all dogs and cats who are not “healthy,” but who are likely to become “healthy,” if given medical, foster, behavioral, or other care equivalent to the care typically provided to pets by reasonable and caring pet owners/guardians in the community.  

Conditions

Behavioral

  • Mildly shy dogs/cats (i.e., initially makes conscious calm attempts to avoid people instead of approaching them, then makes attempts to visit; no hiding or aggressive behavior)
  • Dogs/cats with minor handling issues (i.e., during any of the handling tests – ears, tail, paws, teeth, stroke, or restraint – dog retracts or avoids handling)
  • Mildly jumpy/mouthy dogs (i.e., energetically jumps on, applies front feet, or applies open mouth with no pressure a few times during test)
  • Inappropriate litter box use in cats (not yet addressed via medical or behavioral measures)
  • Inappropriate urinary/bowel habits in dogs (not yet addressed via medical or behavioral measures)

Medical

  • Demodex (localized, under six months of age)
  • Malnourishment
  • Obesity
  • Ear infection
  • Earmites
  • Intestinal parasites
  • Infants that are five to eight weeks of age
  • General diarrhea without a diagnosis
  • Coccidia
  • Upper respiratory infection
  • Kennel cough
  • Fatty tumors
  • Infants under five weeks of age (weaned orphans)
  • Unweaned infants without a nursing mother (*see exception under U/U related to failure to thrive)  
  • Unweaned infants with a nursing mother (*see exception under U/U related to failure to thrive)  
  • Cystitis
  • Pneumonia
  • Ringworm
  • Sarcoptic mange
  • Broken bones
  • Heartworms
  • PDA
  • VSD (if small/restrictive)
  • Pulmonic Stenosis (if mild)
  • Subaortic Stenosis (if mild)
  • Parvo + (if not moribund)
  • Parasites
  • Secondary Sex Characteristics
  • Nonspecific Gastritis
  • Nonspecific Dermatitis
  • Non-life-threatening wounds or injuries
  • Corneal Ulcers
  • Non-Diabetic Cataracts
  • Prolapsed Third Eyelid
  • Entropion and Ectropion
  • Acute Hepatic Lipidosis


Treatable Manageable

Definition: The term “manageable” means and includes all dogs and cats who are not “healthy” and who are not likely to become “healthy” regardless of the care provided; but who would likely maintain a satisfactory quality of life, if given medical, foster, behavioral, or other care, including long-term care, equivalent to the care typically provided to pets by reasonable and caring pet owners/guardians in the community; provided, however, that the term “manageable” does not include any dog or cat who is determined to pose a significant risk to human health or safety or to the health or safety of other animals.  

Conditions

Behavioral

  • Dogs with low sociability (i.e., show limited interest in humans or interactions with humans)
  • Moderately shy dogs/cats (i.e., initially makes conscious attempts to avoid people instead of approaching them, does not visit unless encouraged to do so; some hiding; no aggressive behavior)
  • Dogs/cats with moderate handling issues (i.e., during any of the handling tests - ears, tail, paws, teeth, stroke, or restraint - dog freezes, applies muzzle or teeth to hand and/or gets over-stimulated (frantic pawing, jumping, pushing, etc.)
  • Moderately jumpy/mouthy dogs (i.e., energetically jumps on, applies front feet, or applies open mouth with no pressure regularly during test)
  • Inappropriate litter box use in cats (not responsive to medical or behavioral measures)
  • Inappropriate urinary/bowel habits in dogs (not responsive to medical or behavioral measures)
  • Dogs with mild/moderate separation anxiety (i.e., whining, barking, scratching at doors, windows, etc. that lasts for a few minutes upon/after departure; no serious damage to belongings; no harm at all to dog)
  • Level 3, 4, or 5 resource guarders with protracted warning and high sociability  
  • Dog-dog leash reactivity/aggression without a bite history  
  • Excessive and inappropriate vocalizations in dogs/cats (i.e., barking, whining, yowling, crying, etc - not responsive to medical or behavioral measures)

Medical

  • Mild arthritis
  • Blindness/deafness
  • Missing limb
  • Allergies
  • Demodex (localized, over six months of age or generalized under 6 months of age)
  • Congestive heart failure
  • Chronic health conditions: kidney or liver disease, bladder stones, asthma, etc.
  • Controlled seizures
  • Controlled diabetes
  • Feline urinary syndrome with blockage
  • Irritable bowel disease
  • Chronic ear infections
  • Bladder stones
  • Canine hypothyroid
  • Feline hyperthyroidism
  • Hip and elbow dysplasia
  • Demodex – generalized over six months of age
  • FIV+
  • Feline leukemia
  • Bloat
  • VSD (if large)
  • Pulmonic Stenosis (if moderate or serious)
  • Subaortic Stenosis (if moderate)
  • Mitral or Tricuspid Dysplasia
  • Tetralogy of Fallot
  • Degenerative Valve Disease
  • Dilated cardiomyopathy
  • Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy
  • Restrictive/unclassified cardiomyopathy
  • Heartworm disease (damage to the heart that does not improve with heartworm treatment)
  • Chemodectoma
  • Cognitive Dysfunction
  • Diabetic Cataracts
  • Osteoarthritis from old injuries or non-unions
  • Anxieties Secondary to Medical Conditions
  • Urinary or Bowel Incontinence
  • Treatable Blood Dyscrasias


Unhealthy and Untreatable

Definition: The term “unhealthy and untreatable” means and includes dogs and cats who, at or subsequent to the time they are taken into possession:  

  • Have a behavioral or temperamental characteristic that poses a health or safety risk or otherwise makes the animal unsuitable for placement as a pet, and are not likely to become “healthy” or “treatable” even if provided the care typically provided to pets by reasonable and caring pet owners/guardians in the community.  
  • Are suffering from a disease, injury or congenital or hereditary condition that adversely affects the animal’s health or is likely to adversely affect the animal’s health in the future, and are not likely to become “healthy” or “treatable” even if provided the care typically provided to pets by reasonable and caring pet owners/guardians in the community.  
  • Are under the age of eight weeks and are not likely to become “healthy” or “treatable,” even if provided the care typically provided to pets by reasonable and caring pet owners/guardians in the community.  

Conditions

Behavioral

  • Dogs with very low or no sociability (i.e., show extremely limited or no interest in humans)
  • Seriously shy or feral dogs/cats (i.e., makes conscious attempts to avoid people instead of approaching them; frequent or constant hiding, freezing or shaking involved; may employ growling, snapping or snarling to maintain distance from people)
  • Dogs with serious handling issues (i.e., during any of the handling tests - ears, tail, paws, teeth, stroke, or restraint - dog growls, air snaps, applies teeth with pressure or serious intent to hand and/or gets over-stimulated (frantic pawing, jumping, pushing, etc.))
  • Seriously jumpy/mouthy dogs (i.e., energetically jumps on, applies front feet, or applies mouth with pressure regularly during test causing pinching, bruising, scratching, or tearing of clothing)
  • Dogs with serious separation anxiety (i.e., whines, barks, scratches/chews at doors, windows, etc. for an extended period upon/after human departure; causes serious damage to belongings; and/or chewing, digging, head-butting, etc. causes harm to dog or leads to life-threatening ingestion.)
  • Level 3, 4 or 5 resource guarders with low sociability  
  • Dogs with serious dog or cat aggression (i.e., lunges, snaps, snarls or is otherwise difficult to control around a cat or a dog and/or history of repeated injury to other animals)
  • Dogs with serious stranger/barrier issues (i.e., growls at, lunges, snaps, snarls or bites at people when behind fence, kennel door, crate door, or other door)
  • Dogs or cats that bite people (i.e., has delivered injurious bites to adults or children)

Medical

  • Acute or end stage kidney failure
  • Acute or end stage liver failure
  • Hepatic lipidosis with complications
  • Spinal cord injury
  • Parvo + (if moribund)
  • Blood dyscrasias not responsive to therapy
  • Distemper
  • Hip dysplasia with osteoarthritis
  • Malignant, untreatable tumors
  • Infectious diseases not responsive to initial treatment
  • FIP+
  • Feline Leukemia (if moribund)
  • FIV + (if moribund)
  • Panleukopenia
  • Uncontrolled diabetes
  • Uncontrolled seizures
  • Cardiac hemangiosarcoma
  • Kittens and puppies receiving proper medical care whose condition is not improving (failure to thrive)
  • Life-threatening wound/injury
  • Respiratory Distress not responding to treatment
  • Incontinence (inability to control bladder or bowels) with advanced age